The Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador (HFNL) designates what it deems to be the best examples of heritage structures in the province – those it finds to be worthy of commemoration and protection.  Designation by the Foundation is commemorative only and does not place any particular restrictions on the owner, however, to maintain its heritage status a building must retain its heritage character. Legal owners of heritage properties can apply for designation to HFNL.

There are three categories of designation depending on a structure’s historical and architectural significance as determined by a panel of heritage experts:

1)  Landmark Registered Heritage Structure – Heritage buildings or engineering works that are the finest and most architecturally and historically significant examples in the province.

2)  Registered Heritage Structure – Heritage buildings or engineering works that are good examples of their type in a good state of preservation and that help to tell the story of Newfoundland and Labrador.

3)  Recognized Heritage Structure or Feature – Heritage structures and features which do not meet the above criteria, but which help to conserve the heritage of a community, and in particular those which support a heritage district or neighbourhood.  In addition to churches, houses and commercial buildings, examples might include sheds, fishing structures, stone walls, root cellars and cemeteries.  (Note:  This classification is currently being piloted in one or more Registered Heritage District. At the present time applications under this category will not be entertained from other communities)

Buildings considered for Heritage Designation will generally predate Newfoundland Confederation (1949), however “Modernist Style” structures from the period 1930 – 1975 are also eligible (for more information on Modernist Architecture click here).

 

What Does Designation Mean?

  • The property owner agrees to maintain the heritage character of the property including the use of historical building materials.
  • The property owner maintains all rights to the building and is able to adapt the building as long as any changes are in keeping with its heritage character and integrity and the owner consults with HFNL.
  • The owner becomes eligible for restoration and maintenance grants with amounts being tied to the level of designation (for grant information and applications see: ). A building must be designated prior to submission of a Heritage Grant application.
  • A plaque, owned by HFNL, will be placed on the building that tells of its historical significance.
  • The structure is listed on the Provincial and Canadian Register of Historic Places.

 

How Do I Apply?

  • As a first step contact HFNL to discuss your property.
  • Complete an application for designation including as much information as possible on the building: age, builder, style, uses over time, inhabitants, associations with the life and history of the community or province, stories and oral accounts associated with the property and known alterations to the property over time.  HFNL staff can assist you in undertaking this research.
  • Inclusion of proof of legal ownership and photos and other documentation on the exterior and interior including current and historic photos.
  • The completed application will be reviewed and approved by the Board of Directors of the Heritage Foundation.

 

Click here for our downloadable forms.

 

For additional information and assistance contact Michael at 739-1892 ext 3 or michael@heritagefoundation.ca