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the website for the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Frequently Asked Questions

Individuals or groups considering designation generally have a number of questions concerning the Heritage Foundation's designation and grant process. The following are some of the more frequently asked questions:

What does designation as a Registered Heritage Structure mean?
The Heritage Foundation is a Crown corporation of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador and has been given the mandate to accept applications for and to designate structures as Registered Heritage Structures. There are two designation deadlines a year, March 1st and August 15th. Registered Heritage Structures are eligible to apply for restoration grants. The grant deadlines are also March 1st and August 15th.  

How old does the structure have to be before it can be designated?
Generally the Foundation will consider structures built circa 1900. This date will vary depending on the actual structure and its location within the province. Age is important but other factors are also considered.

What other factors are considered when designating a structure?
Along with its age a structure's architecture, style, historical associations and condition are among other factors considered.

If my structure is designated, do I have to open it to the public?
No. The structure remains your private property. You do not surrender your privacy.

Can I just apply for a grant?
No. A structure must be designated before a grant will be considered.

What requirements does designation bring with it?
The property owner would agree to maintain the exterior of the structure in an original state and ensure that no inappropriate materials (i.e. vinyl siding, historically inaccurate windows, etc) would be used in doing normal routine maintenance.

What is the difference between provincial and municipal designation?
There are two levels at which properties are designated in Newfoundland and Labrador, provincial and municipal. The Heritage Foundation handles provincial designation, while municipalities handle the other.

To be designated provincially by the Heritage Foundation, a structure must be of some provincial significance, that is to say, be a provincially prominent example of a particular architectural style and/or have historical associations that are important on a provincial level.  
  
Under the Municipalities Act, an incorporated town can designate a building, structure or land as a Municipal Heritage Site. A site should have local architectural, historical, cultural, social and/or religious value to be designated by a town. Towns can designate things like graveyards, parks, open spaces and the like, while the Heritage Foundation can only designate buildings or districts.  
    

If you have any additional questions concerning the Heritage Foundation of Newfoundland and Labrador, or the designation and granting process, please feel free to e-mail us at info@heritagefoundation.ca.